Political participation

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Political participation

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AD469: Zimbabweans see traditional leaders as influential but want them to stay out of politics

The functions of traditional leaders in Zimbabwe’s rural areas are outlined in the Constitution and the 1988 Traditional Leaders Act. They include promoting and upholding the cultural values of their communities, facilitating development, and administering communal lands. They are also charged with protecting the environment, resolving disputes in their communities, and exercising any other functions conferred or imposed on them by an act of Parliament.

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Most Zimbabweans endorse an inclusive national dialogue, but support for POLAD framework is much weaker

A new Afrobarometer survey shows that most Zimbabweans think that the national dialogue process should go beyond political parties and include participation by other stakeholders, including businesses, churches, and civil society.

But only about one in four citizens endorse the Political Actors Dialogue (POLAD) framework as the only viable option for bringing stability and development to Zimbabwe, while almost half of citizens do not offer an opinion on the POLAD framework. 

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Malgré la confiance accordée, les Togolais pensent que les chefs traditionnels devraient rester neutres en politique

La majorité des Togolais expriment leur confiance envers les leaders traditionnels mais pensent que les chefs ne devraient pas se mêler de la politique, selon l’enquête la plus récente d’Afrobarometer au Togo.

Les citoyens estiment que les chefs traditionnels jouent un rôle important dans la gouvernance locale, surtout dans la résolution des conflits. Et l’enquête révèle que plus d’un tiers des Togolais ont contacté leurs chefs traditionnels au moins une fois au cours de l’année écoulée.

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Africans have a strong message for their traditional chiefs: Don’t tell us how to vote. Surveys show how Africans reconcile their preference for democracy with trust for traditional leaders.

Originally published on the Washington Post Monkey Cage blog, where our biweekly Afrobarometer Friday series explores Africans’ views on democracy, governance, quality of life, and other critical topics.

 

Carolyn Logan and Luyando Mutale Katenda

 

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AD438: Juventude (des)interessada? Perspetivas dos jovens sobre a democracia e a governança em Cabo Verde

De acordo com a Fundação Mo Ibrahim (2019), as tendências no que diz respeito à promoção da integração da juventude em Africa são preocupantes. Considerando que em 2019, por volta de 60% da população do continente era constituída por menores de 25 anos, a integração socioeconómica da juventude coloca-se como primordial para o futuro do continente.

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Les Béninois expriment plus de confiance envers les leaders religieux et traditionnels et l’armée que les leaders politiques et institutionnels, selon l’enquête d’Afrobarometer

Les leaders religieux et traditionnels et l’armée sont les institutions les plus dignes de confiance aux yeux des Béninois, suivies par la police, selon une nouvelle enquête d’Afrobarometer.

La majorité des Béninois accordent également leur confiance aux conseils communaux, à la Présidence de la République, et enfin aux cours et tribunaux. Mais moins de la moitié des citoyens affirment qu’ils font confiance à l’Assemblée Nationale, à la Commission Electorale Nationale Autonome, et aux partis politiques au pouvoir ou de l’opposition.

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Women’s interest in politics increases, though gender gap remains

Ghanaian women’s interest in public affairs and political discussion increased between 2012 and 2015, reversing a decade-long decline, a new analysis of Afrobarometer data indicates.  This shifting attitude of women toward politics was recorded prior to the seventh presidential and parliamentary election of the 4th Republic, when there was a clarion call for an increase in women’s participation and representation in the country’s politics.

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Youth Day: Does less engaged mean less empowered? Political engagement lags among Africa’s youth

Political and civic engagement by African youth is declining and is particularly weak among young women, according to new Afrobarometer survey findings.

The findings, which are being released on International Youth Day 2016 (August 12), show African youth are less likely than their elders to engage in a variety of political and civic activities, including voting, attending community meetings, joining others to raise an issue, and contacting leaders. Young women express significantly less interest in public affairs than young men.

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PP34: Does less engaged mean less empowered? Political participation lags among African youth, especially women

African Youth Charter outlines young citizens’ rights and responsibilities, affirming that “youth are partners, assets and a prerequisite for sustainable development and for the peace and prosperity of Africa” (African Union, 2006, p. 2). Article 11 of the charter gives every young citizen “the right to participate in all spheres of society” and mandates that states encourage youth activism and ensure gender equity in political representation and participation (p. 6). Among responsibilities, the charter cites full participation in civic duties such as voting in elections and volunteering.

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AD101: Youth political engagement in South Africa: Beyond student protests

South Africa’s Youth Day 2016 (16 June) marks the 40th anniversary of the Soweto uprisings, during which thousands of high school students marched to protest the introduction of Afrikaans as a language of instruction in the public education system. The demonstrations proved to be a watershed in the fight against apartheid by bringing South African youth to the forefront of the liberation struggle (South African History Online, 2016).

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Majority of Swazi’s of the opinion that political parties are divisive and therefore unnecessary

Two out of three Swazis were of the opinion that political parties were divisive and therefore  not necessary in Swaziland’s democracy.  Only (31%) felt that they should exist in order to give them choice when selecting candidates during elections, according to the most recent Afrobarometer survey held in Swaziland.  This shows a six percentage point increase in support for the banning of political parties compared to 2013.

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Les Togolais sont en faveur d’une plus grande inclusion politique et économique de leur diaspora

Une grande majorité des Togolais se sont prononcés pour le recensement et le vote aux élections nationales des Togolais de la diaspora : c’est ce que révèle la dernière enquête Afrobaromètre qu’a réalisé le CROP en octobre 2014.

Sur le volet économique et pour neuf Togolais sur 10, le gouvernement devrait mettre en place des mesures incitatives pour encourager et soutenir l’investissement des Togolais vivant à l’étranger. Par ailleurs, Il faut noter que 16% des Togolais déclarent recevoir des subsides d’amis ou de parents vivant à l’étranger.

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Which African democracies are vulnerable to political instability?

Most of us were taken by surprise when Mali – a budding democratic success story after three open elections and two peaceful transitions of power – imploded with a separatist insurgency, a military coup, and the breakdown of state control in 2012.

What did we miss? Were there signs of impending instability that political observers overlooked in the pre-crisis period? And if so, can such early-warning indicators help us predict political risks for other African governments and political regimes?

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AD40: Zimbabwe seen headed in the wrong direction, but president's leadership approval steady

Most Zimbabweans express discontent with the overall direction of their country, deteriorating economic conditions, rising corruption, and the performance of their elected leaders – except for President Robert Mugabe.

According to the latest Afrobarometer survey, popular assessments of the country’s direction and of how members of Parliament (MPs) and local government councillors are doing their jobs are considerably more negative than in 2012, but a majority of Zimbabweans continue to approve of the president’s performance.

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