Corruption

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Corruption

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AD493: New president’s ‘zero tolerance’ confronts Zambians’ perception of government failure to control rising corruption

The damaging effects of corruption on countries, industries, and individuals are well documented, including its destructive drain on public trust and on the legitimacy of government institutions (Sullivan et al., 2012; Myint, 2000; Diamond, 2007).

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Overwhelming majority of Kenyans see corruption in the judiciary, Afrobarometer survey shows

A large majority of Kenyans say at least some of the country’s judges and magistrates are corrupt, the most recent Afrobarometer survey shows.

Even though a majority of Kenyans trust the courts, the share who say that most or all judges and magistrates are involved in corruption increased between the years 2016 and 2019. Trust in the courts was weaker among better-educated citizens and urban residents.

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Kenyans grow more dissatisfied with government fight against corruption, fear retaliation if they report

A majority of Kenyans say the level of corruption in the country has increased and the government is doing a poor job of fighting it, a new Afrobarometer analysis shows.

Findings from a national survey in late 2019 show that among Kenyans who had contact with selected public services during the preceding year, substantial proportions say they had to pay a bribe to obtain the services they needed. The most frequent experience of paying a bribe was among citizens who sought assistance from the police.

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AD488: Africans see growing corruption, poor government response, but fear retaliation if they speak out

Developing countries lose $1.26 trillion a year to corruption, theft, and tax evasion, according to analysts’ estimates – a sum large enough to lift 1.4 billion people above the poverty line for six years (Fleming, 2019). Unless we control corruption, development experts say, achieving the other Sustainable Development Goals will be all but impossible (United Nations, 2019; Rubio & Andvig, 2019).

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AD477: Zimbabweans’ fear of retaliation for reporting corruption compounds ‘pandemic within a pandemic’

In his inaugural speech in November 2017, President Emmerson Mnangagwa pledged to fight corruption, a scourge that he said “remains the major source of some of the problems we face as a country, and its retarding impact on national development cannot be over- emphasized” (Sithole-Matarise, 2017).

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Ugandans increasingly critical of government performance in fighting corruption, see reporting corruption as risky

Ugandans are increasingly dissatisfied with their government’s performance in fighting corruption, according to Afrobarometer survey findings.

Seven in 10 Ugandans say their government is performing “fairly badly” or “very badly” in combating corruption.

More than three-quarters of Ugandans believe that citizens who report corruption to the authorities risk retaliation or other negative consequences

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Ugandans see increasing levels of corruption, report having to pay pay bribes to get public services, Afrobarometer survey shows

A majority of Ugandans say the level of corruption in the country increased last year, according to a recent Afrobarometer survey.

While somewhat fewer citizens see increasing corruption than in previous survey rounds, many Ugandans still report having to pay bribes to obtain public services.

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Majority of Zambians see corruption increasing, fear retaliation if they speak up, Afrobarometer survey showsMajority of Zambians see corruption increasing, fear retaliation if they speak up, Afrobarometer survey shows

A growing number of Zambians say corruption is on the rise and the government is doing a poor job of fighting it, a recent Afrobarometer study shows.

As in many African countries, the police are most widely perceived as corrupt, followed by officials in the Office of the Presidency, local government councilors, and members of Parliament.

An overwhelming majority of Zambians think that ordinary people risk retaliation if they report corruption to the authorities. 

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Les Camerounais perçoivent une hausse de la corruption, craignent des représailles en cas de dénonciation

La plus récente enquête d’Afrobarometer au Cameroun révèle que la majorité des Camerounais perçoivent que la corruption a augmenté au cours de l’année écoulée.

En plus, la plupart des citoyens affirment qu’ils risquent des représailles ou d’autres conséquences négatives s’ils signalent des actes de corruption.

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Majority of Gambians see corruption increasing and government failing in efforts to fight it, Afrobarometer survey shows

A growing number of Gambians say corruption is on the rise and the government is not doing enough to combat it, the latest Afrobarometer survey shows.

Over the past three years, citizens’ perceptions of widespread corruption among public officials have increased significantly. A substantial number of Gambians also report having to pay bribes to obtain public services, and only half believe they can report corruption to the authorities without fear of retaliation.

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AD462: Les Sénégalais déplorent la hausse du niveau de corruption mais craignent des représailles en cas de dénonciation

La corruption constitue l’un des plus gros freins au développement du continent africain. Elle cause, à elle seule, une perte annuelle estimée à 148 milliards de dollars, soit 25% du produit intérieur brut (PIB) de l’Afrique (Financial Africa, 2019). Pour lutter contre ce phénomène, le gouvernement du Sénégal a créé, depuis 2012, l’Office National de Lutte Contre la Fraude et la Corruption (OFNAC), une autorité administrative indépendante dotée de l’autonomie financière.

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Liberians demand accountability from government but see corruption on the rise, Afrobarometer survey shows

Liberians want an accountable government but say that corruption is increasing in the country, the latest Afrobarometer survey shows.

Nearly two out of three citizens prefer an accountable government over one that can get things done without being answerable to its citizens. But most Liberians say some key elected officials “never” or “only sometimes” listen to their constituents.

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Ugandans approve of government pandemic response but voice concerns about corruption, Afrobarometer survey shows

A new Afrobarometer survey in Uganda shows that a majority of citizens approve of the government’s management of the response to COVID-19, although many raise concerns about corruption.

More than three-quarters of Ugandans believe that at least some of the resources available for responding to the pandemic were lost due to corruption among government officials.

Only about half of citizens say they trust government statistics on COVID-19 cases and deaths.

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Ugandans perceive increase in corruption level, give government low marks on fighting graft, Afrobarometer study shows

A majority of Ugandans think that corruption is getting worse in their country and that their government is doing a bad job of fighting it. Most say ordinary people risk retaliation if they report corruption to the authorities, findings from a recent Afrobarometer survey show.

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Mauritians see increasing corruption, mistrust political class and key institutions, Afrobarometer survey shows

More than three-quarters of Mauritians say the level of corruption in the country increased last year, according to the latest Afrobarometer survey, and majorities express mistrust of their leaders and institutions.

Low levels of popular trust mark the established political class, including both the ruling coalition and opposition political parties, as well as the president and prime minister, the National Assembly, and the Electoral Commission.

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AD421: Africans see growing corruption, poor government response, but fear retaliation if they speak out

Developing countries lose $1.26 trillion a year to corruption, theft, and tax evasion, according to analysts’ estimates – a sum large enough to lift 1.4 billion people above the poverty line for six years (Fleming, 2019). Unless we control corruption, development experts say, achieving the other Sustainable Development Goals will be all but impossible (United Nations, 2019; Rubio & Andvig, 2019).

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AD396: Apesar dos ganhos, os angolanos mostram-se insatisfeitos com os esforços do governo no combate a corrupção

Em apenas um ano, Angola melhorou da 167a para 146a posição no Índice de Percepção da Corrupção (CPI) da Transparency International (2020), em grande parte devido à força das reformas anticorrupção introduzidas após a posse do Presidente João Lourenço em Setembro de 2017 (Jornal de Angola, 2020; O Observador, 2020a).

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Tunisians are concerned about smuggling and corruption, say government is handling them poorly, Afrobarometer study shows

Most Tunisians say smuggling and corruption are problems in the country, and very few think the government is doing a good job of resolving them, a new Afrobarometer study shows.

Citizens are more than twice as likely to say they prefer buying legal but expensive goods over cheaper smuggled goods. Although most Tunisians say it is wrong to work as a driver of smuggled goods, a significant proportion think it is “wrong but understandable” to buy smuggled goods.

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A majority of Sierra Leoneans say the Commissions of Inquiry are effective, Afrobarometer study shows

A majority of Sierra Leoneans say the Commissions of Inquiry are effective in addressing corruption in the country, a new Afrobarometer survey shows. 

By a 4-to-1 margin, citizens also say the commissions are impartial and do not favour one party or group over another. Only about one in 10 citizens hold negative views of the commissions’ impartiality and effectiveness, though about one-third say they don’t know enough about the commissions to offer an opinion.

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Majority of Angolans see risk of retaliation if they report corruption, Afrobarometer survey shows

Despite appeals by the president and attorney general to join the national crusade against corruption, a majority of Angolans believe that reporting corruption cases carries risks of retaliation or other negative consequences, according to Afrobarometer’s first survey in the country.

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Para a maioria dos angolanos, a denúncia de casos de corrupção acarreta riscos de retaliação

João Lourenço, Presidente da República, e Hélder Pitta-Grós, Procurador Geral da República, têm multiplicado apelos aos cidadãos angolanos para juntarem-se à cruzada nacional contra a corrupção, denunciando activamente os casos de corrupção. Entretanto, os dados do primeiro inquérito do Afrobarometer revelam que a maioria dos angolanos consideram que a denúncia de casos de corrupção acarreta riscos de retaliação ou outras consequências negativas.  

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AD316: Os São-Tomenses apoiam os impostos mas não confiam nos oficiais tributários

governamentais, muitos países em desenvolvimento enfrentam obstáculos na implementação de sistemas fiscais eficazes e eficientes (Tanzi & Zee, 2000). Impostos diretos, como o imposto de renda pessoal, são particularmente difíceis de administrar, pois exigem processos e estruturas complexas para identificar os contribuintes e facilitar e reforçar a conformidade (Kangave, 2005). Dadas estas dificuldades, muitos países em desenvolvimento dependem fortemente de impostos sobre o consumo que não podem ser evitados mesmo por aqueles no setor informal.

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AD316: São Toméans support taxes but don’t trust tax officials

While tax revenues are a critical part of financing government services, many developing countries face obstacles in implementing effective and efficient tax systems (Tanzi & Zee, 2000). Direct taxes, such as personal income taxes, are particularly difficult to administer as they require complex processes and structures to identify taxpayers and facilitate and enforce compliance (Kangave, 2005). Given these difficulties, many developing countries rely heavily on consumption taxes that cannot be evaded even by those in the informal sector.

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AD314: La violence politique a encore le vent en poupe en Guinée

La violence est l’utilisation de la force physique ou psychologique pour contraindre, dominer, causer des dommages ou la mort. Elle peut provenir d’une incompréhension, de l’ivresse ou de la drogue, d’une agression à domicile ou dans la rue, d’un extrémisme politique ou religieux – les circonstances et les ca uses de la violence sont légion.

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