La démocratie

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Ugandans’ views on multipartism

Ugandans support multipartism as a viable political system of governance but many are not satisfied with the way multi-party politics work in Uganda, the latest Afrobarometer survey shows.

A significant proportion of Ugandans say that competition between political parties often leads to violent conflict, that the opposition political parties and their supporters are often silenced by Government, and many fear becoming victims of political intimidation or violence during election campaigns.

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WP160: The effect of exposure to political institutions and economic events on demand for democracy in Africa

In a democratic political regime, politicians and ordinary citizens must accept elections as the legitimate means of choosing who will govern. Losers must patiently wait until the next election to have an opportunity to elect a leader according to their preferences, and winners must restrain themselves from changing the rules to increase their power.

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Les Burkinabé affirment leur soutien de la démocratie, rejettent le régime militaire comme méthode de gouvernance

La grande majorité des Burkinabé préfèrent la démocratie à toute autre forme de gouvernance et affirment que les élections sont la meilleure méthode pour choisir les dirigeants du pays, selon une nouvelle enquête d’Afrobaromètre.

Une nette majorité rejette le régime militaire comme méthode de gouvernance et soutient que les pays voisins ont le devoir d’essayer de garantir des élections libres et de prévenir les violations des droits humains au Burkina Faso.

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BP159: Bonne gouvernance et démocratie en Afrique de l’Est: Que pensent les citoyens?

Au cours des dernières années, quatre pays de l’Afrique de l’Est – le Kenya, la Tanzanie, l’Ouganda, et le Burundi – ont connu une évolution politique et démocratique différente. Deux d’entre eux, le Burundi et l’Ouganda, ont connu des guerres civiles qui ont provoqué des dégâts multiformes, alors que les deux autres ont bénéficié d’une relative stabilité.

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Les Béninois expriment un fort attachement à la démocratie, mais décrient sa mise en œuvre actuelle

La plupart des Béninois préfèrent la démocratie et rejettent toute forme de gouvernance non-démocratique, mais la proportion de la population qui se prononcent satisfait de leur démocratie actuelle a baissé de moitié depuis 2008, selon la dernière enquête d’Afrobaromètre. Comparativement aux résultats de 2008, l’insatisfaction quant à la nature de la démocratie qui leur est offerte s’est dupliquée, de 27% à 53% des répondants. Ainsi, alors que la demande de démocratie reste fortement élevée, l’offre a diminué de façon drastique, laissant croire que le Bénin a un déficit de démocratie.

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WP1: Support for democracy in Africa: Intrinsic or instrumental?

Based on comparative analysis of original survey data from Ghana, Zambia and South Africa, this paper assesses the attitudes of African citizens towards democracy. Is democracy valued intrinsically (as an end in itself) or instrumentally (e.g., as a means to improving material living standards)? We find as much popular support for democracy in Africa as in other Third-Wave regions, but less satisfaction with the performance of elected governments.

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WP2: Attitudes to democracy and markets in Ghana

Based on comparative analysis of original survey data from Ghana, Zambia and South Africa, this paper assesses the attitudes of African citizens towards democracy. Is democracy valued intrinsically (as an end in itself) or instrumentally (e.g., as a means to improving material living standards)? We find as much popular support for democracy in Africa as in other Third-Wave regions, but less satisfaction with the performance of elected governments.

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WP3: Attitudes to democracy and markets in Nigeria

Less than a year after the inauguration of a new democratic government, the attitudes of Nigerians towards democracy and markets were tested in a national sample survey conducted in early 2000. The findings reveal a fervent attachment to democratic values in Nigeria, as well as a remarkably high assessments of the new regime’s performance. Whether these views reflect a durable consensus, or merely temporary “transition euphoria” that may yet be undermined by the difficulties of achieving real political and economic change remains to be seen.

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WP4: Democracy and economy in Uganda: A public opinion perspective

Surveys of Ugandan attitudes toward democracy and markets suggest that the country has achieved differential forms of success in the political and economic spheres, and that it faces different challenges in each. In the political arena, considerable progress has been made in mobilizing mass participation, but political competition has yet to be adequately guaranteed. This may not be surprising given that Ugandans, more than most fellow Africans, associate democracy with preserving social peace and national unity.

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WP6: Uganda's Referendum 2000: The silent boycott

On 29 June 2000, Ugandans faced an historic choice. They went to the polls to select a form of government for their country. The referendum question asked citizens to choose between an existing >movement= system and a >multiparty= system. At stake in the vote was the popularity of the >no-party= political arrangements that have evolved in Uganda over the last fifteen years, bringing to the country a measure of stability and growth.

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WP7: Public opinion and the consolidation of democracy in Southern Africa

Based on public opinion surveys, this paper reports preliminary findings on progress towards democratic consolidation in six Southern African countries. There was considerable variation in responses among the countries studied, but overall the findings suggest that democracy, although still incompletely understood, nevertheless generates widespread popular support in most of the region.

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WP8: Views of democracy in South Africa and the region: Trends and comparisons

By most standards, South Africa’s new political system qualifies as a genuine democracy. But a constitution, relatively well run elections, and stable, elected, representative institutions do not complete the democratic picture. A key question remains: are South Africans truly citizens of their country, willing to support, sustain and defend democratic practices as a consolidated democracy requires? The evidence from a national public opinion survey conducted in 2000 suggests that in fact the country still faces numerous challenges before democratic consolidation is complete.

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WP11: The Afrobarometer Network Round 1: Compendium of comparative data from a 12-nation survey

All too often, the orientations of the general public towards political and economic change are unknown, undervalued or ignored.  How do Africans understand democracy?  Which aspects of good governance and structural adjustment do they support or reject?  And how do they behave as citizens and as actors in civil society?  The Afrobarometer seeks to answer these and many other, related questions.  By giving voice to African citizens, it challenges the view that elites understand the preferences of “the people,” including minority groups within society.

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WP12: Democracy and national governance in Zimbabwe: A country survey report

Two decades of ZANU-PF rule has left Zimbabweans yearning for change. The survey revealed deep discontent with the democratic performance of the government and the management of the economy. Citizens overwhemingly reject one-man and one-party rule and clear majorities support democracy and prefer it to any other alternative. The constitutional reform exercise that coincided with the survey sowed seeds of hope at the time and helped to spur the current quest for change in the country.

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WP13: Citizen perceptions of democracy, governance, and political crisis in Lesotho

Lesotho has been governed in many different ways since its founding as a nation in the mid-19th century, including episodes of both democratic and authoritarian rule. This history is reflected in the ambivalence shown by Basotho in response to questions on an Afrobarometer questionnaire administered in early 2000. Almost half the sampled population were unable to define democracy, a figure higher than in any other southern African country.

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