Corruption

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Corruption

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African publics back rights, responsibilities of media watchdogs

A majority of Africans support an independent news media and expect the press to play an active role in reporting on poor government performance and corruption, a new analysis of Afrobarometer survey data shows.

In surveys representing more than three-fourths of the continent’s population, 57% of respondents demand media freedom, although some countries and regions are more willing to tolerate government control than others. Less educated citizens are less likely to support a free news media that holds governments accountable.

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AD26: Mauritians trust their institutions but say corruption is growing

Mauritians trust their political institutions but are increasingly concerned about corruption, the latest Afrobarometer survey shows.

More than two-thirds (69%) of Mauritians say corruption increased “somewhat” or “a lot” over the year preceding the survey. This finding corroborates results of a survey commissioned in 2014 by the country’s Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC), in which 60% of
Mauritians said that high-level and small-scale corruption had increased over the past three years and that they expected it to worsen.

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Tanzanians see increased corruption, ineffective fight against it

A majority of Tanzanians say that the level of corruption in the country has increased over the past year, according to the latest Afrobarometer survey.

The police, tax officials, and judges and magistrates perceived as the most corrupt. Citizens’ rating of the government’s handling of the fight against corruption has improved slightly since 2012 but still remains mostly negative – and far more negative than a decade ago. Tanzanians
laud news media’s effectiveness and show considerable support for the role played by the media in exposing corruption.

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Malawians’ trust in public institutions declines as perceptions of corruption increase

Afrobarometer conducted a public perception survey between 22 March and 5th April, 2014 which covered trust in public institutions and corruption among public officials. This press release is meant to highlight the key findings in those two areas as a way of informing public debate and policy.

Download the full press release

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Basotho see increased corruption despite government efforts

Basotho perceive an increased level of corruption in the past year, with the highest levels of perceived corruption among the police and business executives, according to Afrobarometer’s most recent survey. Survey results show that citizens are divided in their assessment of the government’s handling of the fight against corruption.

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Mauritians still trust their institutions but think corruption is strongly affecting them

Afrobarometer’s latest survey shows that although Mauritians still trust their political institutions, they are increasingly concerned about corruption.

In this context, six in 10 (60%) Mauritians said in the latest report by the Independent Commission against Corruption that it was their opinion that high level and small scale corruption had increased over the past three years and the same number believed that corruption could only worsen and a fourth (26.8%) did not expect a change.

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Batswana want president, officials to account and declare assets amid perceived escalating corruption

Batswana express support for a law on declaration of assets and want the president and officials to appear before Parliament to account, according to the findings of the latest Afrobarometer survey. The survey, conducted in June 2014, also reveals that just over half of Batswana say that the level of corruption has increased over the past year.

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BP153: Going in the wrong direction? Ugandans report declining government effectiveness

In the Round 5 Afrobarometer survey in Uganda, 74% of Ugandans said the country was headed in the wrong direction. This was a dramatic change from just one year earlier, when 28% said Uganda was headed in the wrong direction. Analysis of these findings suggests that this perception is fuelled by several factors, including dissatisfaction with prevailing economic conditions and declining personal living conditions (see Afrobarometer Briefing Paper No. 101).

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BP110: Perceptions and realities of corruption in South Africa

Corruption is a growing concern in South Africa. Cases of alleged corruption of government officials are detailed in the news media on a regular basis, and include allegations targeted at the highest levels of government.The Afrobarometer survey has been tracking public attitudes towards corruption since 2000. This bulletin outlines relevant results from the Afrobarometer survey (Round 5), conducted between October and November 2011 in South Africa, and compares them to findings from several previous surveys.

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BP63: Governance in Madagascar: Scope and limits of the fight against corruption and decentralization

Madagascans view corruption as an endemic problem affecting the entire administrative and political life of their country. However, a number of indications point to improvements in this area since 2005. First of all, there are now fewer critics of the current situation than there were in 2005. Secondly, the real incidence of corruption (i.e. the number of individuals personally affected by corruption) has significantly declined. However, the proportion of undecided respondents has increased significantly, suggesting a degree of helplessness.

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