Policy papers

Welcome to the Afrobarometer publications section. For short, topical analyses, try our briefing papers (for survey rounds 1-5) and dispatches (starting with Round 6). For longer, more technical analyses of policy issues, check our policy papers. Our working papers are full-length analytical pieces developed for publication in academic journals or books. You can also search the entire publications database by keyword(s), language, country, and/or author.

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PP60: Change ahead: Experience and awareness of climate change in Africa
Biggest survey ever on climate change in Africa finds worsening quality of life, deteriorating conditions for agricultural production, limited “climate change literacy” among average citizens. Read more
Les questions relatives à l’emploi et plus précisément l’emploi des jeunes constituent une préoccupation particulière pour tous les états du monde, car le développement de leur nation de même que le bien-être des citoyens en dépendent. Read more
PP58: Africans want open elections – especially if they bring change
Africans want high-quality elections – especially if they bring change at the top. Read more
Basotho perceptions of government corruption and poor performance drive decline in popular trust. Read more
PP56: How free is too free? Across Africa, media freedom is on the defensive
In Africa, as elsewhere, mass media face increasing opportunities and threats. Read more
PP55: Are Africans’ freedoms slipping away?
Africa’s closing political space marked by less freedom and a willingness to trade liberties for security. Read more
Support for democracy stays strong in Africa, but “dissatisfied democrats” who will safeguard its future are few. Read more
L’égalité genre au Togo: Progrès et points sombres. Read more
“Bounded autonomy”: How a lack of political independence limits Zimbabweans’ trust in their courts and electoral commission. Read more
PP51: Taking stock: Citizen priorities and assessments three years into the SDGs
Unemployment tops the most important problems that Africans want their governments to address, followed by health, infrastructure/roads, water/sanitation, education, management of the economy, and poverty. Read more

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